Buttons in Dialogs and Messages

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Buttons in Dialogs and Messages

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While the Q++ Main Window is always visible, at some times, Q++ will display dialogs and messages to request some input from you, before being able to proceed. This topic reviews the different buttons that you are likely to encounter and their general meaning, individually and when combined together on the same message or dialog.

 

Dialogs and messages both appear in front of the screen and must be attended to before you can continue. The difference between them is that dialogs are complex, containing many different controls and settings, while messages contain only a text message and some buttons.

 

The buttons that appear in dialogs are :

 

The OK button with a green checkmark is used to save the settings of the dialog. A good example is the GridOptions dialog which is used to set the various options that relate to a DiaryGridLine, and most property editors.

The Cancel button with a red cross is used to close the current dialog without saving any of the changes made since the dialog was opened. The net effect will be as if you had never opened that dialog.

The Help button is used to open the help file to the topic most appropriate to the currently displayed dialog.

The Close button is used to close dialogs which do not require you to save or not save changes made since the dialog was opened. An example of such a dialog is the Holidays Manager and any other dialogs that act directly on Q++ Data. Whenever a dialog opens that contains a Close button, you will know that any changes made in that dialog are "live" and irreversible (there is never a Cancel button at the same time as a Close button).

 

 

The buttons that appear in messages are smaller and do not contain any images :

 

The OK button without an image is used in messages that inform you of either the result of an action, or that an action is about to occur. The term "OK" is often a source of confusion with some users. It does not mean that Q++ is asking you to "accept" something, it is there to be used when you have read the message and means to the program "OK, proceed". The meaning of this button can vary slightly depending on which other buttons are present. This is discussed below.

The Cancel button without an image is used in messages appear in response to an action that you have started. Whenever there is a potential danger with the operation that you are about to perform (lengthy, cannot be reversed, ...) then Q++ warns you about that danger and lets you cancel the action using the Cancel button.

The Yes button is used in messages where Q++ is asking for either confirmation of an action that is to occur, or if there are more than one possible way of performing the action you have requested. Clicking on it selects the solution that Q++ thinks is proposing in the text of the message. The meaning of this button can vary slightly depending on which other buttons are present. This is discussed below.

The No button is used in messages where there are more than one possible way of performing the action you have requested. Clicking on it selects the alternative to the solution proposed by Q++ in the text of the message.

The Help button is used to open the help file to a topic that explains the currently displayed message in more details and provides links to related topics, such as definitions of the terms used in the message's text.

The Abort button occurs very rarely; usually when a problem is identified during the launching of Q++, in messages that give you the alternative of either accepting the solution proposed by Q++, or aborting the launch.

 

 

Which of the above buttons appear together in a message tells you much about the situation that the message is responding to and the options that you have (in the examples below, the Help button is never shown since its presence does not affect the meaning of the other buttons or of the message).

 

If the OK button appears alone, it means that you are informed of the result of an action, or of an action that is about to occur. If the action is about to occur, then you have no choice (you cannot stop it).

If the Yes button appears with the Cancel button, it usually means that you are being asked to confirm an action that you have initiated. Q++ is asking you for confirmation because there are potential dangers with this action (lengthy, irreversible, ...). You choices are to either confirm your action of to cancel the action completely.

If the Yes button appears with the No button it usually means that, in the course of an action which cannot be cancelled, or at the very end of an action, two possible options have arisen and you are given the choice between these.

If the Yes button appears with both the No and Cancel buttons, it usually means that there are 2 ways of performing an action that you have requested and that you are given the possibility of choosing between these 2 options. You can also choose to cancel the action.

 

 

For information and tips on the use of dialogs and messages under Windows, see the corresponding section of the Windows Primer.


Topic 102019 updated on 20-Sep-2011.
Topic URL: http://www.qppstudio.net/webhelp/index.html?q__dialogs.htm