Languages and Translations

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Languages and Translations

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Q++Studio Languages are similar to real-life languages, but have 2 important advantages :

 

Q++Studio languages are general : For example, that means that you can create a "Coca-Cola" language that will let you specify the way this client wants text to be translated. For example they might want the "priority" at the top of each day to say "important" instead.

 

Q++Studio Languages fit in a hierarchy : In the example above, if the "Coca-Cola" diary was in English, you certainly would not want to create a "Coca-Cola" language and then type in all the English translations of all tokens, just to differentiate "important" from "priority".

 

You could have Q++Studio make a copy of the language, and then only modify "priority" in this copy. However if you have many customized jobs, this sort of inefficient duplication could quickly eat up disk space and slow down access to a database becoming bloated. None of the above is necessary. In the above example, you would just need to create the language "Coca-Cola". Then in the Tokens Manager, you would simply translate "priority" into "important" for that language. Nothing else.

 

 

 

 

If Q++Studio does not find a translation for a particular token in a language, it looks for that translation in the languages parent, and so on and so forth until it reaches the root language Q++Studio Defaults.

 

The Q++Studio Defaults Language : If Q++Studio does not find a translation for a particular token in a language, it looks for that translation in the languages parent, and so on and so forth until it reaches the root language Q++Studio Defaults. There are few built-in token translations for Q++Studio Defaults, but it can be very useful to ensure that your diaries follow your corporate guidelines.


Topic 104039 updated on 03-May-2018.
Topic URL: https://www.qppstudio.net/webhelp/index.html?thelanguageshierarchy.htm